Teach 2 Dumb Dudes

Matt From Blue State Conversations: Bridging The Political Divide

May 02, 2022 Joe Bento Season 2 Episode 3
Teach 2 Dumb Dudes
Matt From Blue State Conversations: Bridging The Political Divide
Show Notes Transcript

In this episode we speak with Matt, one half of the Blue State Conversations podcast. Matt is what we like to call "Republican Classic", living in the blue state of Massachusetts. We discuss the state of the Republican party and how it's turned into the party of Trump, how both sides are going tot he extreme, and most importantly how we can bridge the gap and all become more tolerant. What started off as a conversation with many disagreements, turned into a conversation of compromise and agreements. Check out Blue State Conversations at: http://bluestateconversations.com/

Hey, what's up, everybody. Welcome to another episode of teach two dumb dudes, um, bento as always with my co-host Bobby. Today, we're talking to Matthew. He is one half of the blue state conversations podcast. Matthew and will are a couple of conservatives who live in Massachusetts. They run a podcast that talks about being conservative in a blue state and how we can bridge the gap between red and blue left and right. All that good stuff. Um, conversation, honestly, it was great. we originally thought it might feel a little confrontational just because our views are so different, but after talking to them, We slowly realized that we have a lot more in common than we thought we did. And that's kind of the point of this podcast is to try to bring people together. And even if there are political differences, we need to be able to talk to each other on a friendly level. Uh, respectful level and just kind of listen to what the other side is saying instead of just getting all ramped up and having these moments where we get instantly furious and. Reactive. So hope you guys enjoy it. We talked about political things.

Bento:

Hey, Matt, how's it going? How's it going? Good. How are you doing?

Matt:

Not too bad. It'll probably just be me tonight. Well is occupied, so, oh, okay.

Bobby:

Sorry to hear

Matt:

that. No, he's he is he has a newborn, so he tends to sometimes get called away. Makes sense.

Bobby:

Yeah, I know how that goes now.

Matt:

So that's one of the real strengths of having two guys right there. You can always divide and conquer.

Bobby:

You're not lying. You're not lying.

Bento:

Massachusetts, Matt. Yeah. Yeah. W what? Whereabouts. Oh, nice. Yeah. We're right down here in Rhode Island. Yeah. Coventry area. Oh

Matt:

yeah. I used to, I used to live down in Bridgewater, so

Bento:

yeah. Nice.

Bobby:

Well again, thanks for coming on. We appreciate you taking the time to come on from your show. And if you'll tell everybody the name of the

Matt:

show. Sure. Blue state conversations is the name of our show,

Bobby:

blue state conversations. Thank you. I don't want to mess it up. So,

Matt:

and we are two conservatives for some reason that always gets lost in the translation, but that's. That is the name of the show. Yeah,

Bobby:

absolutely. And so when you say that your conservatives give us a little more, a little more detail in that, because I feel like, you know, a lot of time people have kind of

Matt:

conservative. Yeah.

Bobby:

Right? Yeah. But not only that people have a really hard time, I think, in, in today's world of identifying with one specific form of thinking. And so if you wouldn't mind,

Bento:

I have a hard time identifying with

Matt:

one. Yeah. But yeah, so yeah, so my, for myself, I'm more of a traditional I guess what you'd say, Christian conservative. So if you, if you had to describe me in one politician, that'd be Reagan just without the spending, but the, so that's closer to me. So I'll, I'll, I'll hit a lot of the traditional boxes. I'm very cliche that way. So I'll, I'll typically be for small, but small but strong federal government less regulation probably more on the free trade side of things. I tend to be socially conservative as well. So you know obviously I have a Catholic background, so it will probably be similar to that. So, you know, obviously instead of practicing. Yes. Yep. So even with so even though you have yeah, I don't want to list like, you know, 400 and things, but that, that, that should give people a good idea. My partner who you know, obviously he's not here tonight, he is also conservative, but I'd say, you know, he's, he's he's Protestant. So he comes from a little bit of a different one. We do have a couple of disagreements. I use a little bit different on. The abortion issue just on how we should approach that from a legal standpoint, both of us are pro-life obviously so there's, there are some differences, but both of us are going to typically be conservatives. But the big thing that we have is that we grew up conservative and blue area, deep blue area I'm from Massachusetts, and then he he's from Pennsylvania, but he's from the Pittsburgh suburbs so deeply. Yeah. Yeah. So, so that, that was actually kind of the Genesis for our show was having. Having to actually talk to groups of people and it would be just us, you know, it's not like, you know, you see these people that come from Texas and it's like, yeah, me and all 400 of my friends, all, a lot of times I'd say something and a whole room would turn around and go, no, you idiot. And it's like, oh geez. But yeah,

Bobby:

yeah. Right. You must find yourself odd man out a lot around

Bento:

oh yeah. Like a Yankee

Matt:

fan of Fenway, you know? Yeah. It's pretty much the same thing. Yeah. You might be able to spot the other guy across the stadium.

Bobby:

Oh man. Too bad. Ah, well, and that's one of the things like, I, you know, I think, I believe, you know, with your podcast you know, states in your and your description there that you guys are trying to bridge the gap. So you can openly have conversations and not have everyone turn and be like, what the fuck is that guy?

Bento:

Yeah. So with, let me kind of roll into this cause I'm curious, you know, you're like, well, like I call you know, Republican classic, you know, good old fashioned republicanism. How do you feel about where the party is today? Yeah. I think I need to throw that right, right at the top, but I'm always fascinated because it's tough to find people like yourself who just kind of have that old school Republican mentality that haven't just gone over to the side like that. Yeah.

Matt:

So I think the problem that the party has right now is the base has a disconnect from its leaders where the leaders are not. Like w and it's a very valid concern where basically the base elects their leaders, and then the leaders go in and do like 10% of the things they're based wanted. And then turn around and ask, why are you all mad? And this, this is leading to some really interesting fracturing just between where the party's going. I you're seeing a lot more isolationists arrive in the Republican party. They used to be the party of Warhawks, right. Especially during Bush Republicans were in the war. But now you see, you know, Tucker Carlson, big isolationists. I just was watching Matt Walsh, who was a very influential conservative writer. He's saying, why do we care about Ukraine? There's a lot of isolationism would come back in. So I think the problem is, is the, the identity of the Republican party used to be kind of small government taxes, but we're in a social sort of conflict between two different ideologies to the parties. Not really sure how to deal with that. You've got the old school, like, you know, more towards myself than a very socially conservative. You've got the moral libertarians they're going to be, Hey, just if they, if they want to smoke weed and have prostitutes, then go ahead. You know, that's not our business. Right. But so that, that battle there, I think that's one of the reasons you do have. You could sneak Trump in over someone like Ted Cruz was, there was a real battle over where do we want to go? And for a lot of people, it really was Romney and McCain really turned a lot of people off. If they're, if you're a Republican, you had to vote from Romney. And my very first vote was for Romney and it was just like really strong. The

Bento:

John McCain I'll tell you, like McCain actually didn't turn me off at all. It was Pailin it was his running mate. Like he just killed himself

Matt:

with that. Yeah. I mean, McCain had a little bit of an impossible situation. You can't you know, I mean, running after the president with the great recession is, is sure if you're from that party, it's, it's real tough. I think what happened was a lot of. A lot of the people in the party were looking for somebody to fight in terms of going out there and, you know, making points about the opponent. He's not doing it. You know, like the whole thing, when he, when he refused to say Barack Hussein Obama, cause it wasn't collegiate while the media was saying, you know, he's kind of a fake war hero. And it's like, that has turned that, that annoys people. And then I think, I think McCain, wasn't the biggest issue. It was McCain and then Romney, Romney comes along and he kind of is this like, you know, he's a conservative until he has to make a decision. And then all of a sudden he's gone well. You know, and that, that really turned a lot of people into, are we going to ever have somebody who's a conservative, are we going to get the people who we want? There were a lot of other minor things like Herman Cain being taken out by a 30 year sexual assault allegation, you know, like he was a big front runner and you saw. Somebody just came out and said, Hey 30 years ago he, he came at me in an elevator campaign over and I think that that really pissed people off because they're like, isn't the other side running Hillary Clinton that really pisses people off when it's like, your party is subjected to that.

Bento:

And that's the trouble with politics in general now is like, if, if you want to run for office in any shape or form, like everything you've ever done now is on the internet. Like it's millennials and gen Z people. If you know, I think I'm 41 years old. I'm not some stupid shit. Thankfully there were no cameras around. So no evidence. There's no, it's like, everything is on video. Everything is uploaded and you think you delete it and it stays forever,

Matt:

you know? Oh, I know. And then you find these messages from people. I mean, Matt gates has gone through that right now. You've got that, but yeah. And it's also very popular to go and hit people. There are mistakes. Yeah. It used to be kind of like, as long as somebody did it, like 20, 30 years ago, it was kinda like, well, that's 20, 30 years. That's a lifetime, you know, they might say that

Bento:

unless it was like super egregious or something.

Matt:

Yeah. But a lot of times you'll see stuff like, Hey, you know, it's like like you have that funny situation of Brett Kavanaugh saying, you know, I like beer, which is like a weird argument was like, do you like drunk Supreme court justices was like, kind of the argument, you know, the cartoons of like, he's going to be out there. You're just going to be an alcoholic making decisions for the country. I like that's the case.

Bento:

Then the means are fantastic for that.

Matt:

And I think that's the problem with a lot of our divide is that we're, we're sort of political arguments have always existed and sort of any country, you know, the Roman empire last thousands of years, they clearly had political differences. But the, what really can drive apart a place is when you have cultural geographic and language differences. Right? So when it becomes like there's going to be the red part of the country and the blue part of the country, and they're going to live in two completely different ways, that's when you can really start to see stuff hit the fan, because it really matters who wins you, can't marae. You know, if you have people in Texas and they're going to their way of life is threatened by people from California. And then whoever wins the presidency, they get to decide that's when it really starts to become militant.

Bento:

But it's interesting though, because like, I can't really think of a time where our parties have really. For their way of life. You know what I mean? Like there's always, there's always going to be a hot button topic, but everyone's always arguing over the dumbest shit. It's not that we don't, you know what I mean? Like they, I say they, I mean, just politics in general, the media, they feed us these little things that they want us to argue about when in reality, both Republicans and Democrats are both making money, being in the Senate, being a congressperson. And, and we're just, it's just like, look over here at this and why they're doing their own thing. You know what I mean? Like they're more, they're more aligned with. Then we are

Matt:

taco Carlson's M and M segment. The

Bento:

cyber costs is a

Matt:

whole nother thing. Like I like him, but sometimes it's like, I'm listening to him going, what am I mad at?

Bento:

He's like, he's like trying to be bill O'Reilly, but even more outrageous. And it just kind of goes to show, not just Fox, but like every media now, how they're trying to make these characters of themselves.

Matt:

Cause if you, if you lose your audience, exactly. If you come out there, if you can get out there and when the Eminem's are no big deal, everyone would, he he'd have nobody the next night. So it's like, it's, it's, it's almost like he's in an impossible situation. Same thing with a lot of YouTube channels they're finding cause there's so many more options now. Yeah. Well they just had that Lindsay Ellis, one of the original ones, she, her channel's gone because she dared to say something that her fan based in LA gone, she's done. Oh really? Yeah. Over 10 years on YouTube. That's so, but yeah, I think for. In terms of just combat, you know, as I always like to tell my friends, you know, that we haven't had somebody beat someone on the Senate floor yet at that point, then I'll say we're close to a civil war. But I, I, but it may not have to happen on the side of floor. It may be a low level brush, fire type thing where you do Antifa and the proud boys do contain combat language. They talk about fighting each other. Right. You know, we're out in the streets fighting, right. They made it literally

Bento:

they dress a military gear, you know, you have, you know, the Antifa, whereas mass probably wasn't wearing tactical gear. Right.

Matt:

Everybody's going to be tactical and all that. And because it is part of it is a fantasy, you know, you're fighting for this great cause and you get dressed up and it's, it's kind of like going to a prom that you're very excited. So, but I think what our issue is going to be, as you said, like that cultural and, and that language as well. If you have. Like when I say the word Patriot, that's a right-wing word. If I say the word cisgender, it might be a hit. It's a left-wing word. And if you hear someone using your words yeah. If you hear somebody using those words you can pick their belief system out right on the spot. You know, I called myself a cliche a little bit earlier, but how many times have you heard somebody just say speak for maybe five minutes? You can go while he said Patriot truth and God. All right, well, that's a conservative, you know, you, you, you you've gone are the days where it could be like, oh, he's a moderate Democrat. You know that that's not even wrong. It doesn't sound like the rest of the conservatives. You know, it's, it's very polarized. And I think that, that goes back to, there's a cultural divide in our goals, how we want the country to run. And so that's, what's underpinning a lot of this and that's why a lot of the stupid stuff is happening. It's people are mad. So they're looking for things to be mad about because it just kind of is ancillary. It's like how, when your girlfriend comes home, you know, she's not mad about the dishes. She's mad about you, but it's going to be about the dishes for some reason. That's, you know, that's, that's kind of how it's playing out

Bento:

and you think. You know, I would say social media has played a massive part in this, and it's so easy to just log into any website now and be like, all right, well, I like this, this and this. Even like those buzzwords that you said, it's only going to show you things in that bubble. And you only going to talk to people that completely agree with you and you know, your, your opinions and your idea ideas are never going to get questioned. And that's dangerous.

Matt:

Yeah. My YouTube suggestions look different than my friends, because mine are gonna look a lot, like when I like to listen to and I actually was listening to, you know, Neil postman made that argument that the problem is, is we've trivialized serious things by putting them on TV because we're not engaging with actual original sources. Like how many times have you watched somebody react to someone else reacting to somebody else? Right. Endless

Bobby:

cycle

Matt:

of reaction. And so you're, you're getting third degree, but people will treat that video as I have original source knowledge of what's going on. Right. You know you know, the five, I there's a channel that I, I used to follow. They used to do a five minute facts. It's like, that's, you probably can't learn at all five minutes. It's a good starting point. Like it's, it's good.

Bobby:

That's all right. Think like social media and YouTube and all that stuff. It's just so dangerous because you're giving people the ability to manipulate just about anything they want in just about any way they want. And because people live in those echo chambers there's, they're never going to run into the other person who says, well, actually, It's not a it's B know whether, whether a or B is in fact true is not really the point. It's the fact that you want people to think for themselves, right.

Matt:

And you have to be able to engage as a partisan. That's another thing we talked about a lot in our show that we don't want it. We're not, we're not here to become centrists. You know, I'm still going to be conservative. I think the democratic socialists are wrong, right. That's me. But I want to be able to be able to talk to a democratic socialist about democratic socialism or understand what they're saying so that I can have an intelligent conversation about why I think it's wrong. And then if I can't have that conversation, I need to go and reevaluate what I know.

Bento:

And that's, what's super interesting too, because I listened to your most recent podcast today before the show is Jesus politic. And honestly for the first 15 minutes, I was just like, wow. I was like, this, these guys are way on the other side of how I think because you know, I'm a, what I call a recovering Catholic. I left the church a long time ago. I, I have a very long journey with religion that we can get into another, another time. But. So if I say I'm atheist now, so when you guys are talking all about that, I was like, wow, these guys are so right wing. And you know, that was my first initial reaction. Then by the end of the show, it was just incredible. How many things that I was like, yeah, I totally agree with what they're saying. And you know, you're looking at points from both sides, so it kind of goes back to that social media thing. Right. Cause if we were just on a Facebook page and you had made a quick comment, you know, I mean, Twitter, God, you're, you're limited to however many characters, even on Facebook. You're only going to say a few sentences and it's so easy to just like combat each other on that and not have a face to face conversation. Whereas if you look at the long form, it's like, yeah, like I actually have quite a lot of common with these two guys.

Matt:

Right? Well, yeah, that's actually one of the, I think one of the articles that I have on, on our, about, on what happened is as I was, we were talking about the Ahmed Arbery case at the time I had made a post and I thought that they were guilty of a crime. What I thought was missing is there was no evidence that it was, it was race-based crime. And I was saying is that this is being made to be more than it is. But the, what I noticed was the amount of people. 'cause, I didn't think it was racist. We're like, well then you must not think it's a murder, but like it says right at the top, right. They committed a crime. However, this is being taken out of context. Right. You know, and it was like, but because I didn't agree, 100% with the sentence, you know, white people bad or whatever it was, they fought then all of a sudden, nothing else. I said mattered. There was

Bento:

always black and white with those people kind

Bobby:

of gray area. I have found myself falling into that trap as well, because there are certain situations where you know, young black man has been killed by a police officer and everyone says all that cotton strings. And I say, well, wait a second, isn't there really a history of this cop being racist? Or is he just a really terrible police officer? Right. And he committed a heinous crime because he's a terrible person or police officer. And I think. We often forget incompetence as a, as a likely as a likely thing that happens. So the likely clause that people are just incompetent there's incompetence in our government in all careers.

Matt:

I mean, you're allowed to make a mistake anymore. It was 100% intentional the whole time to do devious actions. Yes. Yeah, that's a Kim Potter trial, you know, like even the prostitution went, it was an accident. She still goes to jail though. And that was their argument. I, they never, ever really made the argument. No, she meant to shoot him. They just said, no, no, it's still manslaughter. It's still negligent negligence results in a crime. That was their argument. But if you talk to a lot of people, they never watched a single minute. I can pawn a trial. All they knew was, well, my friend put on Instagram that Kim Potter shot a black guy. That's bad. Cause she's a police officer. And therefore, if you're defending her, you must think shooting black. People's okay. And it's like, no, there's so many leaps in that. Right?

Bento:

They get all their information from the headline. And then the comments, the followers read the article and let alone, they don't read multiple articles because you can have one, one hot topic and you can read three different articles and each one will present it to you in a completely different way.

Matt:

Different facts. Matter more than other facts they do. Yeah. And it's,

Bento:

but it's hard, right? Because if you're a guy or woman, that's got a job that works 60 hours a week, you got kids. It's I have no kids. I have a lot of time on my hands. I have trouble keeping up with a lot of this stuff. Yeah. It's difficult. Yeah.

Matt:

And that's, and that's where I think. I'm fine with a lot of these quick five minute facts, great run that stuff. But people are treating that five minute facts as well. I've heavily researched the topic and through my thorough understanding of clicking through the first 30 seconds of every video, I now know. And that that's the problem is it gets treated that way. You know, I, I actually know there's, there's someone I've been talking with recently and it's really not talking. He just, he just accuses me of stuff, but he's a, he's a PhD teaches at Columbia university. And I, I've never met more of a hack of my life. Every he's a walking CNN headline on like, you know, somebody will like a report, like, you know, buy it and we'll come out and say the whole sob line to Peter Doocy and someone will go, you remember what he said? That Trump was unpresidential for saying rude things and he'll go, yeah, well, at least I didn't vote for the president that thought the election was wasn't real. I was like, this has nothing to do with the topic, you know? And then he'll do all that. And then like, you know, my favorite part was when he said he was a serious historian. And so he, he knows what he's talking about. And then I looked at as degrees of musicologist, but he was like lording that like I do musicology. And as you know, the arts interact with politics, therefore you rubes need to listen. It's kind of like, this is just. You know, but it was that, but the common sections were just, he yelled at people who are Trump supporters, Trump supporters yelled at him. And by the end of it, it was like, you could tell like other people watching them kind of like, I don't want to be involved with this.

Bento:

And they moved on and then no one's minds get

Matt:

changed in the process. No one's mind gets changed. Both sides are now more entrenched. And now because everyone else has moved on those two sides are the ones who are making the decisions. That's the worst part, you know? So yeah, there's a lot of stuff that goes into just that communication. And that's why I think that cultural language stuff is really starting to matter. Because again, you know, we always have political disagreements, you know, we always, we always had people who went one way or the other, but the actual threat of the country balkanizing or having a civil war as shown up because instead of everybody being committed to Liberty and we all have different views of Liberty, now Liberty is the right way. That's them. And they use Liberty to crush the minorities. Now the other side goes, well, no, no, they're interested in democracy. And they use democracy to crush our rights. And it's like, the words are no, they're semantically overloaded to mean something on that side.

Bobby:

Yeah, exactly. And that's where it's just about vision. If they keep us all divided, that's how they went. Well, also

Matt:

we participated, right? Because we like conflict, conflict videos do a lot better on YouTube. You know, how many times have you clicked on an article? Because it's titled something like so-and-so messes up big. If I presented you. How many times have you clicked on a video that said something like you know Tucker Carlson makes fairly decent point. However, he misses one small consideration,

Bobby:

but I think that that's a problem from content producers, point of view, that they know very, I mean, even our podcast, your podcast, we know that there is science and data behind the decisions as to how you title things, how long they should be, what type of content you should have. And it's all based to manipulate human psychology, right?

Bento:

Nobody pays for the media anymore. When media went free, there was no subscription fees. So they have to make their money off of these sponsors and off of these clicks. So it's like, right, well, if we're making money on clicks, we got to get you to click. So we're not going to say talk a Carson made a decent point, and we're going to say, you know, a cup of Tucker Carlson wants to burn babies or, you know, something crazy. Yeah.

Matt:

And that's, and that's part of the reason that I make the point is that when we, you know, when we make that choice to click on those conflict driven ones, you know, it, again, it is admittedly you're right. It's much more interesting obviously than just, you know, Hey, we're going to break down international politics. I got stuff to do, you know? But the, I think again, when it goes down to us, because we click on that, it generates that, and then those people become. They become the moneymakers. That's where the money goes. So when you're looking to make money, you have to go chase them. You know, I I'd say, you know, again, like, as I said, my, my episodes, like my, how to build the government series, that's the one that I really love. I really like talking about how you build the government, that what goes into all that stuff. They honestly don't do as well as the one that I titled January five plus one. Right. Because what does everybody want? They want to hear, oh, he's got some guy on there talking about January, say, let's go, you know? And so that is part of the issue, but so I'm not saying that we should always get of. Of all the stuff that's click baity or all the titles, but it's, there has to be an understanding that when you go and watch those videos, they they're presenting an opinion. You may not be fully informed. You may not, you know, you have to go find somebody that, you know, it's not going to be. And then stomp should always track over time. If you're just finding somebody who's just doing hate material, then there, you should see their audience start to drop rather than my concern is the trend is those audiences go up while the people who are more interested in having a conversation trend down

Bento:

and it's not even, you know, and if you can't pay attention, you don't have the time to do that. That's fine. It's just don't have an opinion on it. Or don't have a, such a strong opinion on it.

Matt:

I have a friend who, while in the middle of a three hour lecture told me he doesn't follow politics and then told me I was wrong. And I remember just saying, I haven't literal political science degree. So this is the stupidest comedy you've ever said to me. So you know, it, it, but yeah, a lot of people do. I don't follow politics. Well, so what's your opinion on, well, if you don't believe,

Bobby:

yeah. How's that work and that's where, that's where like, so for myself, you know, I obviously don't have a degree in political science and sort of, for me, I don't follow every news headline out there because. And busy living my life. Right. That's where, that's where like, I am still very strong in my views about, you know, the values that I grew up with. And that's where, you know, I myself consider myself. Socially, I am more of a moderate, but when it comes to finances of our country, I've always kind of leaned a little more on the Republican side, just because I like the actions that they've been able to take up to this point. And so I feel like most of the people I talk to kind of do fall in that category where they do bridge both sides on various topics and various things. And that's where I wish that we could eliminate some of that language and some of those aspects of politics that makes it so divisive. And that's why I say like the clickbait stuff, the, the, the, the, the division of language, like, this is our word, that's your word? Like, to me, none of that makes any flipping sense. Like it just doesn't, and that's why I back out of it, because it's really annoying how everybody just thinks that, Hey, let's take, let's take advantage of all the really dumb people out there. Like, that's what it feels like.

Matt:

Well, yeah, the idea that they know you're dumb. I mean, that's why, like, what does a Nancy Pelosi saying? She's open to the insider training ban. It's like, yeah, she's saying that because she thinks that you'll hear that headline and go, she came around, nothing will ever happen or the bill will have teeth and she'll get to keep doing what she was already doing.

Bento:

And so the rest of them is sending Congress, going to vote against it anyways. Yeah. Right,

Matt:

right. Yeah.

Bobby:

So it's, even if it were to pass, they're going to find it another way to do it anyway. It's like, let's be real. This is a waste of everybody's time. skirt and something else. Like, I feel like when they, when they probably these headlines, like it's like a distraction, you know what I mean? Like, oh, watch this fancy debate while we're really doing other things over here. Okay.

Matt:

Where did she get the 69 million to invest? Right. Where did she get the, and it's because she gets, they get paid 300, 400, 500,000 a speech just for 30 minutes. Elizabeth Warren was 400,000 a year at Harvard to be a lecturer for like one class. Right. And you know, part of that, you understand, because you do, how do you attract the top of whatever field you're in? You pay them more money than everybody else. Right. But on the other hand, This is a problem where you can see the, this is, it causes an incentive to the

Bento:

sentence of two. Great. Right. And it seems to happen to everybody. But I mean, I talk about it all the time and it's like, I feel like there are genuine people that go into politics for the right reasons. You know, I, you may disagree with me in this, but I think Obama was one of them, you know, I think he went in to that job thinking I am going to make some change. And I think these guys just get in there and they start seeing the quid pro quos and the what's the other word I'm looking for.

Bobby:

They get swept up in the making of it all.

Bento:

They just see how they just see how it works and what been doing it forever. Right. And they're like, Hey, this is just how it's going to be. And either you're along for the ride or you're not, and

Bobby:

the break that's like,

Bento:

I think Crenshaw is one of those people. And now you see how much money is made in the stock market. It's like, damn it, Dan, like I was really pulling

Matt:

from, I know when he, when he started saying stuff like, well, it's a Republican red flag lawn on a Democrat, one got through it. That's but yeah, the, yeah, a lot of that stuff, I mean, McConnell falls prey to that, you know, when call, you know, what is he doing right now? He's talking about, we're not raising the debt ceiling. And then the second he's in power and they say, well, you're going to raise the debt ceiling. He goes, of course, I'm not dealing with that. You know what I mean? Like he understands. So he understands the politics. He's fully aware of what he's doing and all this stuff. But the fact that there's like, you can find a good number of conservatives that are like the debt ceiling. It's like, it's funny how it all, and the debt ceiling is only an issue for conservatives every time the Democrats do it. And it's like, that's when you can notice, you can notice that the dilution of information has gotten to that point. Right.

Bento:

I like the golf thing, you know, it's like how many times have I don't play golf, then Trump's like, look, a lot of times he's playing golf. Why aren't we fighting about golf? It's so much

Bobby:

going to Maryland.

Matt:

Oh, I know. What is it? The, these giant federal agencies that cost billions of dollars a year. And then we're worried about, you know, what, he spent four to thousand golfing. Yeah. We spent, yeah. So you're talking about 0.0 0, 0, 0, 2 seconds of federal spending. That's not the issue. So yeah. And that's one of the reasons I think that there is a huge need to de federalize just in general, because so much of our decision making is even if it's a local or state decision, there's a federal component to the decision-making, right? Like, so like Massachusetts you guys probably might've experienced this recently. We just switched all of our exit signs around. So we used to be sequential. So you had exit 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, but now it's my mile marker. And the literal reason is the federal government, that department transportation came in and. Well, we'll give you money if you switch. Right.

Bento:

Same thing. We just changed all our numbers to, I think, last year or two years ago. So

Matt:

there's an incentive behind that to do that, but I'm sure actually said no, which is which was impressive. So Nuna was like, he, he was like, you know, exit four is like my community. I was like, okay. You know, but it does play into New Hampshire knowing which exit you're off of on 93 is kind of a thing. But yeah, but a lot of you can see how that's a state level decision because the states control the egg numbers in their state. But the federal component that comes down from that, at that level is so great that they actually changed the whole thing over. And it always makes me laugh because right under the new exit signs, there's old exit 40. So then we just wasted this. This is

Bento:

ridiculous. And they had to make a sign just for that sign.

Matt:

And, and everyone has GPS who was sitting there going, excuse me, what happened to, you know, everybody's following turn in 700 feet. Yeah,

Bento:

exactly. And what's crazy before that is they used to do it that way and then they change it to this way. And now it's like, just pick away just like Cameron island. We always joke about, we have roundabouts here. Right. And you know, 20 years ago, We had them. They said, no, no more roundabouts, get rid of them. Like they got rid of them. They put in regular roads. And now from the past, you know, five or six years roundabouts everywhere. So they're ripping up putting on about 10 and

Matt:

it's why everybody, every new dev administration's like, we gotta make our marks somewhere. Roundabouts.

Bobby:

Gina is mark and Roma. Gina Raimondo, her mark and Rhode Island are all the highway fixes.

Bento:

Yeah. Right, right. Which was all money she got from the federal government to fix it anyway.

Matt:

Yeah. Oh, I know. And then in mass there, you know, they were where they were talking about putting tolls on state highways. And that was, that was an idea highway as well. So not just like 93 or 90, they're like, if I don't know what state all your listeners are in, but if you just imagine no state route one or something like that, having a tool all the way down at the because the state's run out of money, but then of course, how did they. How do they get more money in? Oh, the federal government comes in and says, Hey, we'll give you this, this, this, this, and this. They run out of

Bento:

money with legal weed up there. Now they must be spoken in dollars swimming in it. Yeah. So

Matt:

that's, it's, it's the fact that we were w when you have so much federal power at that level, then it becomes, it actually matters whether or not you lose an election. Right? Like it matters big time because instead of it being like, all right, well, our trade policy is going to be, be screwed, but fortunately, I don't do trade. So therefore it doesn't affect me. But now it's down to like, whether your, you know, your COVID policy, they just close all the monoclonal antibodies in Florida. The federal government decided what Florida was going to do for its citizens. Right. And it's like, well, at that point, now it matters. Now you have to get a Republican in there because he's going to do the things that when Republicans want to do. And he can

Bobby:

go forward with that.

Matt:

Florida had monoclonal antibody science, whether you could get that the FDA just came in and closed them. And they said, no, no, no, no, no, no. Why just Florida. They ban the use of just, well, one to make an example, but also Florida's the big user. So they, the other states use them. Exactly. That's, that's the thing, because so now that now that you can see how this makes a difference. Now, if I'm a, if I'm a Republican and I I'm going, Hey, monoclonal antibodies saved my life, you know, wait a minute. So you're telling me I got to go vote for Donald Trump or all these to get these guns. And then you can see how it, the sleazeballs get in because he might be sleaze ball, but he's my sleazeball, you know, that's, that's where that attitude becomes relevant because, you know, do I, do I support Donald Trump's womanizing? Do I support you know, the way he tweets? No, but are you asking me that Joe Biden is my other option? No, I'm not going to pick that, you know, that makes no sense, you know? So that's why, you know, getting involved

Bobby:

with people who say the other way.

Matt:

Right. But like how many people were like, yeah, I can't vote, you know, I can't, I have a friend who, you know, she's like, I can't vote for Trump. Why he's just, he's just, he's just horrible. And then like, you know, we're going through our political stances and she's basically like a Trump clone 90% of the way down. And it's like, well, why not vote for him? I can't be associated with that.

Bobby:

Well there is that social pressure. I mean, you tell somebody, you know, you voted for Trump, especially around here in new England and they're like, what? Oh

Matt:

yeah. Other Republicans. Yeah. I had a kid. I remember, I remember I was in college and you know, back when he was first running and they kid came and there was a case at fan and he gave it to me, you know, he's like, oh, you like Trump you're casing fat calmed down. You know, but it was, yeah. So, but a lot of that stuff is because it's so federalized. It makes it, you know, you can't have, would you rather live in California, Texas? It's how do you want to live? Oh, neither. Yeah. You know, it's, you can't be too extreme one

Bobby:

way or

Matt:

the other, but maybe you want to, maybe you want to pick them with Carolina. You want to be more moderate or something, or maybe you won't, you love new England or you. Yeah. Now it's now it's a, now you can't make that decision anymore because well, whoever wins, the government is going to decide the way the country goes to have all of them. Yeah.

Bento:

And there's too much pressure just to pick the president. I know so much more important to pick your senators and congresspeople than the president and people just don't get it and primaries. Yeah. Even your, even your local council, people can make a difference in your day. Right. They will affect your daily quality of life more than a lot of these

Matt:

people. Well, yeah, I think what was it, bill Burr made that joke that like the presence, like a, like a crazy girlfriend, but he only see her once every three weeks. So it's not that bad

Bento:

bill Burr is like my spirit animal, like everything. Like I said, it's just how I feel inside.

Matt:

Yeah. Yeah. If you're, if you're from new England bill, Burr's like your entire sense of humor. You know, but it's stuff like that where your local council and Republicans actually are fairly bad at this libertarians are even worse. What materials are like, we're going to run for president, like anyone who is a libertarian anywhere. So why would someone vote for you? And then they have the, well, then they have the libertarian party libertarians. Yeah. It is funny watching, like libertarian party, like conventions. It's like some guy gets up there, rips his shirt off and he's clearly like never been to the gym. He's like waving it around and it's like,

Bento:

Libertarians are funny. Cause they, they haven't been around that long and they already have such polarizing opposites as libertarian, just as much as the left to the right. Does, you know, you have your anarchy guys and then you have like, oh, like guys, like myself was like, I only identify as libertarian now because I just don't have anywhere to go. Like why I started off as a Republican, when I was in my early twenties, you know, I was into the Glenn Beck and bill O'Reilly's radio show back then, and then the tea party came out and I was like, no, this isn't for me. So then I moved over to the left and now the left is just, just as crazy, but for different reasons, you know, that canceled culture and people can't speak at colleges. And I was like, I just feel like, I feel like a liberal thought of home. So like, I guess I'm a moderate libertarian.

Matt:

Well, well, I, I, you know, I see a lot of that argument between, and that's one of the reasons that I kind of maintain the issue is that there's two sort of cultural ways we're trying to go and we haven't decided yet. And so you can, so no matter what party you found that decision has to be made, you know, it's funny watching especially like libertarians, you know, you're like, I'm a libertarian, so I believe in limited government. Okay. So what are your, so what are your political set? Well, I believe Medicare for all that doesn't sound right? Yeah. You

Bobby:

can't

Bento:

have both of them.

Matt:

But again, that comes down to a lot of it,

Bobby:

like, like libertarianism code. Like if you took the government agencies that exist today and eliminate the fraud, waste and abuse and all of them, you would cut 50% of the employees, most likely because they're so overblown through cronyism and handouts and all that kind of stuff, but that would cut your spending tremendously. And so I think that that form of libertarianism to just make everything smaller is still a good theory, but it's not something you're going to win an election

Matt:

on. The problem is when you have, I believe it's over 60% of the federal budget now goes to entitlements. So your social security, your Medicare, when you, when you're at that level, Neither of those things are politically palatable. Like even the most like diehard, we need to fix the spending Republican. Once they get past like 50, all of those are like, no, no, no, no. I worked for my social security. Oh yeah,

Bento:

sure. I mean, I'm going to rely on that when I retire. So I better be there. I've been paying into it my entire life.

Matt:

It's nice that they, Medicare is now saying like, it's probably 20, 31. We won't have the money anymore. So that's great. Yeah, so I, I really spelled out Megan that, yeah, well, cause I, you know, and the thing is in the Bush, tried to privatize part of it where you actually would be able to have some control and invest in the economy, social security, which actually I believe Sweden does. They, they have that's their model.

Bobby:

How does that work? So, so over time you invest in a private fund.

Matt:

Yeah. Basically it's federalized 401k. It's pretty much

Bento:

thinking about if they did that from the get-go, there'd be so much more money in social security now because you know, whatever, whatever I paid in, whatever I've paid in social security so far, obviously I'm going to need more than that to live because of inflation when I'm, when it's time for me to get it, you know, that's what, that's what a 401k is predicated on. It's like put the money in now it'll grow. So when you need it, you know, if we would've done social security, we would have been. Sweet.

Matt:

Yeah. Well, cause it's, it's, it's predicated on the idea that Ponzi schemes will work. As long as you're big enough, that's the whole idea of social security, because the idea was that, you know, if we, as long as there's 20 people paying for one person that's enough money. That was the idea. But now you're down to like two and that's going to be exacerbated because, you know, we do have an actual population issue with just an aging population. Right.

Bento:

Raising the age limit, you can get it. So, yeah.

Matt:

Right. Oh yeah. I

Bento:

think mine is like 78 now. Like I'm not gonna make it to

Matt:

78. Oh yeah. Well, cause when they, when they originally put it in, like the life expectancy was like 68. So the idea was the idea was kinda like, well, those last three years we'll have, you'll have something, but now people live to like 110 and it's like 40 years of being paid in. So by the time you're still taking money out, the person who was originally paying for you is taking it out now. Right. So that, that, that, that is the issue. But you can see where like if 60% of the federal, budget's not up for debate, how in the world are you going to ever reduce any sort of spending? So we ended up just kind of arguing over random amounts of the military budget.

Bento:

Yeah. I mean, but, but that is, that is the biggest chunk though. I mean, when you think about what we spend in the military and the things that we could use, just even part of that money, you know, we could still be the number, number one, highest spending country in the world. And still cut that significantly.

Matt:

Yeah. I mean, we spend, I believe it, I think last year, or I think 2019, if I'm remembering correctly, we oscillate between about 16 and 20% of the budget, big on the military. And the majority of that is salaries. It's just paying people to be in it paying for their programs, you know, the free college and all that stuff. Well,

Bento:

it's the economy of it too, right. I mean, there's just like here right here. And we're now in the Quonset point we have electric boat, you know, it's a government contracted company that builds submarines. You know, we built tanks and planes and there's so many people that get a paycheck because of military

Matt:

being in solar and other countries. Right, right. Right. When you sell for 10 billion to Saudi Arabia, your product, there's all that stuff that goes into it, you know? So it is tough, you know, that's why sometimes, you know, like what is it, I think free call it like free college for everybody would need, I don't think we'd even make it with just the military budget. Right. You could pay for something.

Bobby:

And that's where like, soldiers are still underpaid. I'm a veteran. And so soldiers are still under underpaid. I don't even like, I'm not even eligible for VA healthcare for ridiculous reasons. Like, and I have an honorable discharge and I still like,

Matt:

Hey, didn't, you're sitting there going, I just want health healthcare. Yeah. Right.

Bobby:

And so, I mean, there are, there are still things where again, like I go back to the fraud, waste and abuse. At my time in the military, like there are people purposely breaking things because it's cheaper to claim it than it is to ship it back. Like things just get left there because it's cheaper to just leave it there than it is to bring it back. Or they sell lots of what's left there to other countries. And so granted, there are some methods of, of, you know, monitoring those things. But overall, the way that we treat how that money is spent in the military, nobody's sitting there believing like, well, this is my. Everyone says it's all my money who cares. It doesn't matter. And so with all that fraud, waste and abuse, that aspect will never, ever be clean. You know, there's no

Matt:

way to control that. They're really, yeah, there really isn't and that's, and that goes back to one of the biggest problems with when we talked a lot about this. You'll you'll find some, you'll either talk to people who are like, actually the entire federal budget should be the military. We has spent 4 trillion on the military and then there's the other side. That's actually, there should be zero military. There should be one guy and he guards the nukes and we'll, we'll unlock them if we need them. That's the two extremes. And the problem is we never even advanced the discussion of what do we use our military for? What's the point of it historically, when have we had, you know, you talk about how, like, when did Al Qaeda strike, when we, when we started pairing our military down after the Soviet union, cause we were like, oh, the Soviets are gone. We're done. Right. And then all of a sudden Al Qaeda had the wherewithal to attack, you know,

and

Bobby:

then we also helped supply them and train them,

Matt:

Parts of them. Yeah. But the Taliban,

Bento:

you know, the Afghans, like we gave them all these weapons to fight the Russians and then they turn around and use the same exact products on us as

Matt:

well. I mean, the Taliban are technically different than the Northern Alliance, but without getting too technical on it, the idea is. That commitment is so long-term, but we're very much like, well, what if these guys have a good cause let's give them weapons. And then five years later, we're like, how did those same inanimate objects that are in that location get picked up by someone else? That discussion almost never happens. We ended up just, you know, they want to blame bind for Afghanistan, but you know, he does deserve a lot of blame for that. But at the same time, it was like, well, we did go into Afghanistan and say we were going to help them build their country up. That's not a, I'll see, you know, Hey, you all set in a couple months, that's 20, 30, 40 years of having a presence in a city.

Bobby:

And I don't care who was president, you were going to get the same reaction like, oh for sure, there are all those people wanted out. And they all assisted the U S in some way, shape or form. And you didn't, you didn't help them enough or give them enough warning. Right. And then there was the whole thing about the list got in the wrong hands. And then they were able to train wreck. Like,

Bento:

I can't write some of this shit.

Bobby:

Right. And so even, but that's what I mean, even without I think like that leaking, like it was going to be a mess regardless, because there's no way that you're doing it. Clean. The U S went into Afghanistan with the idea of changing hearts and minds and frankly, Like garbage. We do

Matt:

have a real problem in America with the idea that democracy is the natural state of man. It's really, yes. Right? Because we tend to view democracy as the opposite of authoritarianism. And it's not, Liberty is demonic. You can have a very authoritarian democratic government because a group of people can vote to take away your rights. Right. So w we tend to view, like what, well, if we just go in there and we give them a president and they vote, then they're going to turn into America 2.0, it's going to be awesome. It's like a lot of these places actually do better with monarchies. Especially if you have cultural traditions that revolve closer to having a hierarchical structure. The idea of egalitarianism is not always accepted everywhere. It's really just not,

Bobby:

You know, that's where like Afghanistan. Are not willing to change. They do not believe in it. They don't need to advance their infrastructure and that's fine. And then

Matt:

it's a tribal society. Why would they all of a sudden want to switch to an egalitarian one? Does that make sense? Yeah. That's not something that happens in 10 years, but you know, we kind of get this idea of like, well, they're only tribal cause no one's told them about the good news of 1776 and then we kind of get that attitude. And, and we even kind of have it here. Like, I don't know how many times everybody's solution to everything is if we just all voted on, it was like, no, it won't because that's the fastest way you vote away other people's rights because why in the world would, I want to protect my opponents, freedom of speech. That's a stupid idea. I don't want to protect this freedom of speech. I want my speech to win. Why would I protect is the reason that I, when we get together and say, no, no, no, we have, we all have that, right? Because we can kind of say to each other, look, we all have the right to freedom of speech. We're not going to take that away from each other. And now where do we go from here? Yes. And that's where you get Liberty,

Bento:

take it away in different. We take it away in little bits though. That's what we do at each other.

Bobby:

But that's where I think it's like, you know, part of the problem here in America is we've talked about this before bento and I, that the idea of self versus. That the mentality of, okay, everybody gets free speech. Like that's not debatable. Everybody gets it across the board, no matter who you are, where you come from. Like that group think mentality doesn't happen often enough. I understand that there are some topics and things that it's very natural for somebody who is passionate or it's an incident or morals or values to stand up for some of those topics. But I think largely across the board, we kind of all still want the same thing, right? Yeah.

Matt:

Well, everybody does want to be able to say what they want to say without fear of being in prison, you know, and obviously, and free speech is obviously a mixed bag just by itself. You know, the reason you have free speech is not because it's the greatest invention of all time. It's because it's a right. You have, and that's, that's all it is. And I think, I think, again, we, we, we've lost a lot of that because almost every discussion that we have about it, right. It really has started to come down to, well, do you need that? You don't have to need it, but you can have it whether or not it's your right. Is the actual question I got, somebody will say to me, you know, why do you need guns? Like, no, I don't need them. Although actually, I, I personally do probably need them because I do, I do, I do a lot of like security work and things like that in my past. So, you know what I mean? So I was like, there is an actual, like, real threat.

Bento:

And just because you don't need it now, doesn't mean you don't need a

Matt:

later, well, who is that? The guy who stopped the church shooter in Texas, he was an NRA instructor for like 40 years. So for 40 years, that guy never needed his guns. And then for five minutes he did.

Bobby:

And

Matt:

thank God he did. Right? And so you may not, you know, you may not, you may not need 10 guns or 20 guns, or I see something like some of these guys, like demolition ranch and they like have entire warehouses. You might not need that, but we're not here to discuss whether something is a need or not. Because then that's where democracy can really overturn it because all of us can get together and decide, you know, Rob doesn't need that. Right. These guys don't need that right now. So we'll just take that away for right,

Bento:

right. Give it to

Matt:

decide what you need, you know? You know, like I, like, I've always laughed at people who were like, no, you don't need duds. Okay. So who's gonna protect me the police. Didn't you just say that they're racist, you know? Well, you're, you're white, so you're fine. Like, well, doesn't that? What about the minorities? That's not good. You see that, that arguments start to come in. When you start to view things around, we're going to make decisions as what we think is best as a group, you're going to be wrong a lot and oftentimes, and nobody likes to be wrong. So they're going to think they're right. They're going to double down. They're gonna continue all the green, all the know tyrannical leaders, right. Nobody ever marched up to them. And when I think you're wrong about being this Mr. King and the king went, that's a good point. No, he was like, throw that guy in jail. Right. And the fact that, that, that extends to groups, you know I mean, just, you can just look at the way people have, if you're unvaccinated in America, just look at the way people treat you, whether or not you think that's right. Imagine switching that out for any other topic. Right. If you imagine, if you had it, like if somebody was pro-choice or pro-life and 90% of the country was against you. Right, right. How fast would we just suddenly not have a job, not being able to not be.

Bobby:

And we've talked about this before. Like it's outrageous that that has come to what it is today. The fact that you can lose your job because you believe one thing or another, like who identifies with their belief that deeply, it just doesn't make sense.

Matt:

Right. Well, I know. And then, and it's like, you know, then, then, then I, you know, I, I have a friend who you know, she's, she's in the medical industry. And I said to her last year, I said, you know, they're changing the definition for natural immunity and that's a little scary. She goes out, it's no big deal. Then natural immunity was not a thing. And if you said natural immunity, you were some crazy Republican crackpot and you probably started the Capitol, you know, All of a sudden I'm reading headlines during Delta natural immunity was six times stronger than the vaccine as like, so I was right all along and all those people who lost their YouTube channels, who lost their businesses, their medical licenses who got arrested, who got dragged down in places that we would just go back and go, sorry about that. Really?

Bento:

And I think they don't even say sire about that, this go on. And if you're one of those people that did get selected to come back and you start your channel again, you're starting all over again. You've lost everything. Yeah. I mean, it's just kind of generation we live in. It's like, if, if, if you're out for a couple of days and your channel's gone, that's it like, you're no one's coming back.

Matt:

Yeah. Yeah. It's not so that's, and that's, that's where you can just see, like, democracy does not always solve every single problem because we can very quickly make a decision that ruins hundreds of thousands of people's lives and just the space of two years. And then like, oh, we were kind of wrong about parts of that, but it's okay. Right. Because, and that's where you get the term. The people at the top are

Bento:

always still going to be at the top. That's just, yeah, it's just, it's always a, I always say it's a, middle-class, it's never a server thing. You know, it's like, you know, the poor people that are poor, they, you know, they get their needs taken care of. By the government, rich people, they don't have a care in the world about finances. And then people like us, you know, we're stuck in the middle paying high taxes and, you know, living paycheck to paycheck and you know, all these other ways that we have to survive,

Matt:

you know, a lot of, a lot of politicians, they do respond to their people. They respond to what that person, if they have a group of people like mansion, mansion knows if he votes for build back better, he's done. He knows. Right. Right. But look at how far he had to go to actually get that. Ah, wait a minute. My constituents are definitely not going for this. And

Bento:

that's just funny. He has a democratic label. He's not a Democrat. No. And it's the same thing. Same thing with like Biden. Like I love him, but I'm like, oh, he's, you know, he's, he's a, he's such a socialist like Joe Biden on a good day as a moderate Republican. Like where

Matt:

I, the best description is, he's always been the middle of the democratic. Like that is true. He's always been very much down in the middle of the democratic party, but when the party moves, he has the new issue of he's. You can't be in the middle of something that's moving, you know? And I think, you know, that is again, as you continue to polarize the two central groups of, you know, there's, you know, for lack of a better description, if you have the party that says, we're the freedom Liberty party, and we're going to be doing all this. And on the other side, Steve, you know, we're the social welfare and social justice party. You know, that doesn't have to be accurate, but just for example, if, and those two are saying that we're the monoliths of these two things and they continue to go away from each other, then you're going to see, you will not be able to have mansion. You won't be able to have Romney because they're, they're, they're traders almost. They don't have, they don't even have a base. And, and that's where you can really, again, if I'm, if I'm a conservative and I'm in the, and I get in and my guys get in, I control all the government. Why would I want to respect your rights? I would not. I would want my stuff to, to win. That's the whole point of, you know, de federalizing because if it, how many times has the IRS been used against the political enemies? Right? How many times, how many times has the, you know, Hold on one second. Yeah, apparently. Yeah. I think she's hopefully all set there. Just got home. So

Bento:

so so last question for you, who do you think is going to be the Republican nominee? 20 24,

Matt:

20 24. I actually, I don't think it's going to be, I don't want it to be Trump. I think that, and again, agree on that. I th I think he has more power where he is now than, than running and losing. I would say that for. Fairly you guys are just going to get poundings of my house. But yeah, so I would just say my big bet, I really do think is going to be DeSantis because I think the Republican party is typically looking for somebody that falls through on the stuff that they said they were going to do. And right now the big person in front of that is to Santa Cruz has made a lot of mistakes, especially calling with the January 6th, the terrorist comment. Some of the, he does tend to come off as smug. Oh

Bobby:

yeah. He's not very likable.

Matt:

Yeah. So it can be, you can go to his head a little bit.

Bento:

Yeah. Well, he, I feel like he used to be a lot more

Bobby:

genuine. I used to like him in the beginning. Yeah.

Matt:

He became a douchebag policy. I absolutely love it. Right. I just know that he does that thing where he he'll come and he'll, you know, he'll, he'll take the question and he'll go, I want to speak to the American people and it's just like, that's so annoying. Yeah. Right, right. So but anyway, so,

Bobby:

so in terms of, you know you know, deemphasizing, the government or arms or the, the term that you keep using the federalizing the government. And so that's where the idea of, you know, Hey states should take control of more of their laws. They're citizens. I've always, I've always liked the idea of states being more different from one another, including their laws, because then as a citizen, that gives me the right to say, Hey, you know what? I just don't love the way that Ryan is going with things, but there's room for me in New Hampshire or Maine or anywhere else in the country. That makes more sense for my family and my values. But my fear is that if we went down that road, How long would it be before we had border conflicts and things like that and

Matt:

different states, Vermont, New York.

Bobby:

But yeah, but, but, but that's what I mean, but because of the way we are, as people, especially in today's world, so divided, so no, no, no, no. Like I don't care what you say you're wrong. Like even, even like, people don't even listen to anymore real life echo chambers. That's what I mean like then like, then we're really talking about like civil war, like potentially massive problems.

Matt:

That's why I usually, oh, sorry. I'm sorry to cut you off, but that's where I bring in that it's a strong central government. So it's an Alexander Hamilton, small, strong central government. It's the idea that, you know, when a state starts to get a little bit too, like ridic, you still have a spring court, you still have a Congress. You still have somebody who is able to kind of step in on some of these things that are very clearly an infringement of Liberty and saying, no, no, no, you can't do that. But the big, I think the big thing is the fact that it's so many personal lifestyle decisions. So many social decisions are being made at a federal level. It's it's, you know, the Supreme court's deciding whether or not somebody has the ability. So why is the Supreme court deciding whether or not somebody has the ability to conduct commerce in a certain, they should not be involved in creating laws on commerce, right? It should be your state makes the law. If Congress doesn't like it, they should, does Congress have the power? No. Okay. Then the state has that. That's what it is. And then the state has to change. And if you don't like the state to move out of the state, you know, like you said but again, it's, it should be that everybody's important. The president support in Congress is important, but your state and your town should be the most important.

Bobby:

Would there be a fear? So I think about Rhode Island, right? We're small, we're close to so many states. If you're in business and Rhode Island, the odds are, you're doing business across state lines, right. So if everybody has a different system, state and state, how difficult is that going to make it to conduct business?

Matt:

Yeah. I mean, you, you already have a lot of laws like that as well. That does make it tough. But again, a lot of times, what, what do states want commerce? Because you want a business to come in and generate money. Why? Because you're taxing it. Right? So the states typically have like, actually, when I think one of the, the original people that really pushed for like desegregation and things like that, it was like train companies because you know, like they, they actually would push against a lot of like racist business laws in the south because like these train companies were like, well, we operate there and we want to make money, you know? So they wouldn't, you know, and having segregated cars was like an extra cost because instead of having five cars and you put in a hundred people now you had to have 10 cars for 50 people. Each it's a huge waste of money. So a lot of those companies would actually be like, actually, can we like de-segregate because this is really ruining my business. Thank you. So you actually, there is actually that pressure that comes back. So there are a lot of things that go into, and obviously, I don't know, we don't want to have two whole shows on this, but. There's a lot of incentives and self-interests that when you play them off of each other in a correct way, by forming factions that want to kind of fight against each other, then they're forced to find a working agreement between the two of them. And that actually reduces a lot of the extremism. Imagine if, imagine if you had to live with somebody who's a democratic socialist, right? You, you figure out well, all right. We're only going to talk about politics on Saturdays.

Bento:

it's like Christmas with my family, you know, it's just something that just have to be off,

Matt:

but how easy is it to say, I'm never going to talk to that person again when it's like some random on the internet, but if it's a family member, then you get to start figuring out. So when you, when you have an interest in making something work, you tend to actually moderate more than extreme. Sure.

Bento:

It's like marriage. It's all about compromise. Yeah, it really is. That's always compromising

Bobby:

good stuff. I wish our government did more of that. Yes.

Matt:

Oh yeah. That's wished to.

Bobby:

Well, thanks a lot, man. Hey, of course, honestly, like I would love to have you back on to talk about God, anytime that's a touch that one. Yeah. Like, and I think we purposely tried to leave that one out because of the potential, like both bento and I like are not religious people. And so I'm very interested to hear your perspective, especially in our age group. Like, you know what I mean? Just to learn about it more like obviously, like, you know, that we're both much more liberal than you are, but you know where we're about learning. Like we want to learn, we don't really care. So that's where even like, you know, the religious aspect, like I'd love to have you back on to talk through that

Matt:

kind of stuff. Oh, anytime. Yeah. We can schedule any time next month. I'm open. I got, you know, I went through my first round, so I, yeah. And if you guys next month, anytime you guys want to send me a message, give me a date and all.

Bobby:

Cool. Awesome. Thanks Matt. Appreciate it, man. Thank you so much. Nice to meet you. Literally this afternoon I followed some girl around with with gloves on, put in some chemical spraying, some chemical on windshields to take off the marker with a rag. Oh nice. That's what I did for like an hour and a half.