Teach 2 Dumb Dudes

Kelsey Walker: Abortion Is Healthcare

July 04, 2022 Joe Bento Season 2 Episode 12
Teach 2 Dumb Dudes
Kelsey Walker: Abortion Is Healthcare
Show Notes Transcript

This week is a heavy episode, but something that needs to be addressed.  We're speaking to Kelsey Walker, founder of From The Green Desk, an organization devoted to helping women cope with child mortality. The focus is on abortion, and Kelsey was brave enough to tell us her story of an abortion she had while living in Kansas. The hoops she had to jump through and experience that was mandated by law will shock and astonish you. From darkness comes light though, and Kelsey shares how she's now helping other woman so they can have an easier experience. Check out Kelsey's website at https://www.fromthegreendesk.com

Bento:

What's up, Barry. Ready? Welcome to another episode of teach two dumb dudes. I'm bento with my boy, Bobby. today we're talking to Kelsey Walker, very sombering subject. We're gonna be speaking to her about abortion. we talk about the Supreme court decision that we're waiting to come down, to deny access to abortion for up to 26 states, Kelsey runs an organization called from the green desk. she helps people that have had any kind of child loss or pregnancy issues, group therapy. she also experienced an abortion herself, at 17 weeks. her daughter hope had a genetic condition, and we kind of go over her story and her experience with a legal abortion in Kansas, which was pretty eye opening for something that's supposedly already legal and the hoops that she had to jump through.

Bobby:

So, and could, and could now become illegal,

Bento:

correct? Right. So this one is a, this one's a wild ride folks. But it's something that's gotta be heard and, and really needs to be,

Bobby:

discussed.

Bento:

Hey guys. Hey Kelsey, how you doing?

Kelsey:

Good. I'm just trying to get my headphones connected and all of that good stuff.

Bobby:

All right. Yeah. That way it's not trying to, that's the name of the game over here, man. Trying to get all that stuff working sometimes. It's it's

Kelsey:

ridiculous. Yeah. And usually it's pretty good about not fighting with the speaker, but sometimes it's. Sometimes this can be kind of worse. So yeah, there we go. No, now I'm

Bento:

in business. All right. Awesome. Where, where you, where you out of Kelsey, Kansas city? No, Kansas city. Nice Kansas city.

Bobby:

Yes. My one of my all time, favorite TV shows Fargo. They did a season in Kansas city about the Kansas city mile back in the fifties and sixties. Yep. Fantastic. Fantastic. I dunno how long you've lived there, but it is actually a place I've always wanted to see because I've heard it's quite interesting and has a really cool history.

Kelsey:

It is pretty interesting. And it, it's got a little bit of everything here because it's such a dead center of the country. It's got a, it's got the feel of a metropolitan, but it's also like really spread out and there's, you know, if you don't, if you go too far, there's farms places, there's also like little like micro farms throughout the city. So it's just a very interesting spot.

Bento:

yeah. Micro farms. Interesting. I ever heard of those.

Kelsey:

Well, so I guess that's kind of my term for him, but like, like my, my aunt has one of 'em, which is like a random, like 12 acres of land where she has a bunch of horses and oh wow. Pigs and stuff. Yeah. That's awesome. And she's in the Kansas city city limits, so it's just a little

Bento:

crazy right, right. awesome. Well, Kelsey, thanks for coming on. You know, I know it's, uh, you know, it's kind of a sombering subject, but it's something that needs to be talked about and you know, something that needs to be, needs to be heard for sure. You know, Bobby and I were just looking up cuz the big talk right now is Supreme court and you know what they're gonna decide. And I thought they were supposed to decide a few days ago, but I, I just looked up and it looks like they're still days away from, from making that decision on, you know, whether to take away some abortion rights from, from the states.

Bobby:

Or sorry, still on the federal

Bento:

level. Yeah. Well right. Give them more on the federal level. Yeah. Give them more control to deny. Yeah.

Kelsey:

Yeah. And it's kind of scary because really like there's 26 states that have, uh, laws that just say as soon as the Supreme court falls with it, then we fall. Right. So it's kind of a, and a lot of them are in the south and in the Midwest. So if you look like it's like, there's gonna be like a giant concave hole middle it's like a block

Bento:

the country, right? Yeah. Yeah. If you're, you know, and of course you can go to another state to get one, but if you're stuck in that middle of that hole, or, you know, we were kind of talk about that as well. If you know, a lot of people, unfortunately, that needed abortions, you know, they don't have the money to travel to do that. Or, you know, they're probably gonna end up being out of network with their insurance company. So it's, it's, it's pretty crazy to think about

Kelsey:

it. Yeah. It's a pretty scary time. And a lot of places insurance actually doesn't cover it. Like for mine, the insurance didn't even touch it. Oh, really? Right. Yeah. Yeah. It was almost $2,400 out of pocket and wow. We were able to, yeah, we were able to get help from the Kansas abortion fund to, uh, fund our abortion. But Really overall, like, there's like, like we're talking about, there's like, there's a big hole and there's also some states like, unfortunately the state that I'm in, which is Missouri that is trying to pass legislature to make it illegal, to, uh, seek abortions outside of the state. So not only to outlaw, they're wanting to put a, a

Bobby:

warrant it's about the residents. If you reside in Missouri, that's what makes it illegal now. Yeah. I've heard that. I've heard that before. Do you know how many states are looking into that? Cuz I just, just heard about that recently within the last week

Kelsey:

or so. So there's a couple of them out there Texas of course had to, had to start something, but Missouri, uh, actually made it so that it was stricter so that it actually puts a bounty out on the, uh, Person that has the abortion, the, uh, doctor that performs the procedure. And then if anybody helps transport

Bobby:

yeah. The escort or something like that.

Bento:

Yeah. Yeah. So even the doctor in the other state could be a, could be liable. Right. And that's gonna, that's gonna make doctors

Bobby:

terrified. How are they gonna enforce those laws? They're gonna go to all those states to like, they're,

Bento:

they're, they're gonna have third RI level. Gustapo that's what I mean, go, you know what I mean? This I'm saying that's what it sounds like. It's like a, such a tyrannical abuse of power.

Bobby:

What's that show what's that show on, on Hulu, the hands made tale. That's what it sounds there. Yeah.

Kelsey:

that's what, it sounds like. A lot of people, a lot of people. Yeah, a lot of people are comparing it to that. And honestly, when you, like, the way they're enforce, some of these laws is, you know, there are people that are getting a hold of plants, C which is the abortion pill to sent to Texas, to help people out. And there was a woman that had a, like a BA an adverse reaction to the plan. C had to go to the emergency room, the nurse, she a, you know, she, her story was that she was, you know, having a miscarriage, but she had told the nurse in confidence that, Hey, I actually took this and the nurse actually reported her to the police.

Bento:

Wow. Yeah, that doesn't break any

Kelsey:

kind of HIPAA law. Oh, it does. And she got into a lot of trouble for it. But, and eventually the woman was released, but wow, there's a ton of craziness just going on with these laws. And then, you know, uh, we can get into my strain a little bit. Another woman in Texas who was 18 weeks pregnant, her name was Anna had a miscarriage or, well, what, it wasn't quite a miscarriage. So basically what happened was her water broke at 18 weeks. She went into the hospital, found out that the baby was malformed and forms and they needed to give her an abortion procedure to. You know, get everything cleaned out. But the thing is, but because she was in the state of Texas, she couldn't have a, a D in, uh, E like the one that I had mm-hmm because it was even though sh she was, her body was needing to recognize that the pregnancy was ending. Right. Yeah. She needed to miss scary. Yeah. Right. It was still technically an abortion, so she had to hope and wait for her body to recognize that. And she also had to hope and wait that, you know, maybe she got an infection and there's a big, really high possibility. And sometimes it takes months for a body to recognize that it needs to miscarry a bad pregnancy. So there's a chance that she could have carried that around for a while, which is. Awful and, and

Bento:

humane. So let's go back and, and let's talk about your, your story and yeah. You know, kind of let us know, what happened, as much detail as you, as you like to give of course. And, uh, and kind of how you got into, building, uh, this from the green desk association that you have.

Kelsey:

Yeah, absolutely. So, uh, unfortunately my story starts out with, uh, tragedy. At 17 weeks pregnant, we found out that the baby that I was carrying had osteogenesis imperfecta type two, which is a really big way to say that she had the lethal form of brittle bone disease. So all of the bones in her body were broken. Wow. Her ribs were breaking in on her heart and her lungs and her skull actually flexed underneath the pressure of an ultrasound wound. So she was, there was no other way to put it. She was suffering and her condition actually threatened my life with the broken bones, of course, because if she, one of the bones would've perforated me, it would've killed me. And. So my husband and I talked to our doctor cuz we went to a maternal fetal specialist after our initial doctor said, Hey, we don't know what this is, but it's bad. You should be prepared right for the worst and sent us onto the next specialist. Wow. And they sent us to the material, fetal specialist. They did a two and a half hour ultrasound to show us all of the book, broken bones. And they also did an amniocentesis to test the genetic material, which is basically a big fricking needle into your stomach. Yeah. And they, you know, they got the diagnosis for the, for the osteogenesis and the doctor came in crying. Because usually she can figure out a way to help in some way. She's the person that you go to when things are right. Are real bad. Yeah. Right. And usually she can figure out ways to help. But sh in this case there's a 0% chance of survival. Right. And if she, you know, if I would've made it to term if, if there was a possibility for that no one survives past 28 days of life. And if they do survive outside of the womb, they suffocate to death because their, their lungs don't develop. Right. So that

Bobby:

was how can they long fell with all the broken bones

Kelsey:

around them? Yeah. Yeah. So that was the role of the dice is that's not a role. Our doctor. Yeah. The doctor said right. The doctor said it's like lighting the dice on fire. Yeah, the doctor said, we, we really recommend you having a termination because there's a real chance that you won't make it out. We already know that she won't survive. Right. But there's a real chance that you won't either. Were

Bento:

you living in Missouri at this time?

Kelsey:

I was living in Salina, Kansas at the time time in Kansas.

Bento:

Do, are, are they legal in Kansas?

Kelsey:

They are currently legal in Kansas. Okay. They are trying to pass legislation right now to make them illegal. Mm-hmm at the state level, which is a whole other thing we can talk about.

Bobby:

Let me ask really quick. So I, I mean, obviously I'm so sorry to hear about this story, right? Yeah. I mean, it's obviously very tragic. And I, I, you know, feel for you desperately as a father, two kids, I can only imagine. Yeah, but what were your views on abortion prior to this all happening?

Kelsey:

Mm, good question. Yeah, that's a great question. Prior to this all happening, I had really been a reproductive rights fighter since I was in high school. Right. I was very pro-choice. You know, when I was a teenager, it was very much so my body, my choice, did I understand what that really meant until I had, you know, kids in on my own had this experience of my own? Probably not, but I've always fought for reproductive rights. Mm-hmm up until this point. And before that, I, I never thought that I would be in the position that I would need one, because you never hear about this kind of situation. You always hear about people going out and having unprotected sex. And then they, you know, will have an unwanted pregnancy

Bobby:

situations like yours always get labeled the outliers.

Kelsey:

Oh yeah. And, and the thing is that 65% of people who have abortions are already mothers,

Bobby:

Which is unbelievable. Yeah. Right? Yeah. We, we look bento and I looked that up and this week, and when we saw that number, we could not believe it. Like that's not how I viewed it at all. I mean, I've always been a pro-choice as well, but I, you know, for me, I've always just thought, well, it doesn't really matter why, but once we saw that statistic I mean, It does feel more and more like I do. You know what the numbers are about how many abortions are done because of medical reasons versus strictly choice.

Kelsey:

It's a pretty high number, to be honest. I mean, there's a lot of atopic pregnancy. There's a lot of rape. There's a lot of incest. There's a lot of, yeah. Oh, I know. Yeah. You know, ones like mine that are, that are after four, I think it's after 14 weeks or after 15 weeks, that number drops way down to like 7% of all abortions. Have the same kind of procedure that I had to have. Okay. And it's because people go in and have their anatomy scan at 17 to 20 weeks, and then they discover these massive illness issues with the pregnancy. Yeah. Because for us, like we thought at 13 weeks we were in the clear, because that's supposed to be the magic number that right. At 13 weeks, you're out of the, the window for a miscarriage. And so we had even told our son that he was gonna be a big brother. And so, yeah. So it was, you know, we even had to, you know, he was three years old at the time we had to explain to him that, you know, hope wasn't coming anymore. And yeah. As a

Bobby:

parent, it can only imagine what back on was like, yeah. Right. My son is three years old and I can't

Kelsey:

Yeah. Yeah. So you know, that that's supposed to be the magic number, but it's, it's really not, and it's just, it's a crazy thing that you, it's an impossible choice as a parent. You have to

Bento:

make, so with talking about the, you know, how many weeks that's also like a very hot debated subject is where do you draw the line? Where, where do you, where do you think that line should be drawn?

Kelsey:

I don't think that it's up to me to decide. I feel like it's the person and their doctor that should decide that line. Because up until I had my own experience, I was like, well, yeah, it makes sense that after the first trimester, you wouldn't wanna go through something like that. Mm-hmm And, and then I went through my own experience. That was very much so into the second trimester. Right. And the thing is that. We had to turn around and get the abor. You know, we found out at 17 weeks had to turn around and get the abortion at 18 weeks because at Kansas, the, the cutoff law is, is 20. And the thing is that it, it would've been nice to have a little bit more time to process, right. What was happening. Sure. Or, you know, if, if it took longer for us to get in, to see the specialist, you know, we were, we were flirting with the deadline.

Bento:

Yeah. Right. But so in your, in your situation, right where yours isn't, I just don't want the child, you know, it was a, it was a medical concern. If you would've hit that 20 week deadline and, and missed it, would you have had to carry that.

Bobby:

Wow. They would deny you the procedure, even though, I mean,

Bento:

you'd have to go outta state to a different state that would allow

Kelsey:

it. And I think the closest one that allowed it was, you know, on one of the coasts.

Bento:

Wow. That is ridiculous.

Kelsey:

Well, the thing that's infuriating. Yeah. And the thing is that what's going on in Kansas right now with their amendment to the Kansas constitution, cuz right now the right issues is protected under the constitution of Kansas. There this vote coming in if people vote, yes, that means that they are going to outlaw all abortions. No matter if it is a threat to the mother, a case of rape or incest. Wow. At any time. So it's. it's kind of scary. What's going on in the neighbor state and the state that I needed the procedure in.

Bento:

I mean, you, you would think at the very least, even, even the religious, like the evangelicals and these people that are, have deep seated issues of abortion, you would think at the very least they would at least allow it when the mother's life is in danger. Like a situation like yours is a perfect example where it's like, it's scientifically proven that the baby isn't gonna survive. So now why are we gonna risk another life on top of that? It's it's, it's, that's unbelievable.

Kelsey:

Well, and it's, it's scary to think about, but, and you know, when you, when you think about the religious aspect of it, there's a whole. Challenge that I have with that. You know, after the abortion, after we lost hope, I called seven different churches to get her ashes blessed or to have a funeral or something, because, you know, I worked for nonprofits at the time my husband worked for the school district. We could not afford like a funeral sure. Or anything like that. And all seven churches said, no, they would not honor that because she was, you know, an aborted baby, but you think, oh my God, you know, at that, at that moment that, you know, someone has grieving because of this, that someone would of those seven churches, someone would step in and say, yes, I'll do that. I also got ambushed after having the procedure, you know, they, there was an ad, the newspapers that said they were an abortion support group and it was a pro-life organization that ambushed me with a pastor that told me I was giving a hell. Wow. Yeah. So I have, it took me a very long time to refine God after all of that happened because of the. The distance that people put between me and him.

Bento:

sure. Sure. Wow.

Kelsey:

So, yeah, and I think that there's a, there's a whole narrative that people also don't know about abortion, which is the laws that are put in place to like at the procedure or during the procedure and at the clinic to. Dissuade you from having the procedure, I don't know if you, it came up in your research or not. But some of these laws actually are what caused me to precipitate post traumatic stress disorder. Mm-hmm from the procedure one of which was, they had to ask me six different times during the procedure, if I wanted to have the procedure done

Bobby:

six

Kelsey:

times. Wow. Yeah. Six times. And that's a requirement. It's a requirement that they talk, they try to talk you out of it. And it's not the caregiver's fault. It's very much so.

Bobby:

Yeah. State law. It's the state. Yeah. They have no

Kelsey:

choice. Yeah, they also make you have another ultrasound and, and B in mind, two days prior, I had had a two and a half hour ultrasound examining all the broken bones, but because of the state requirement, they made us go through another ultrasound and look at the broken bones all over

Bobby:

again. Wow. Geez. Yeah. It's unbeliev and all, because it's just a state requirement. And so, yeah, and really, you know, just to go back, I, I think that in some of like the proposed laws, they say, and, you know, it's a, you know, quote unquote in a medical emergency, they would save the mother. Right. But it's like, it's gonna be way too late at that point. Like, why wouldn't you help these women before?

Bento:

And even if he's not too late to that point, even if it's not too late, you're gonna have a nervous doctor there that is definitely in the back of his head. Like, Hey, if somebody says this wasn't necessary, now I could be on the hook for manslaughter.

Kelsey:

Right. Well, and the scary thing is that you know, one of the things that I found out leaving the clinic was that the, the stage of abortion that I had, which is a D E dilation and evacuation if you go to an emergency room after the procedure, say I had some abnormal bleeding or abnormal cramping or something, if you go to an emergency room, they won't know how to treat you because they are not trained in the procedure that you just had. So if something, they gave me the after hours phone number for the clinic, but how scary

Bobby:

isn't it just normal, like, you know, like mean, obviously I understand it's not a normal procedure, but after the end of the procedure, isn't it just wound care, making sure there's no infections, like that's still typical. Emergency room activities. Isn't it? Well, like it's not, is it, is it really outside of their normal day to

Kelsey:

day? It is outside of their normal day to day. Because it's not just so that level of care mm-hmm, it's an all day thing. It's not, they don't just like go in with a scalpel and it's. You know, one to two hour process, it's a all day affair, right? It starts out around 7:00 AM and you get done around four to 5:00 PM.

Bobby:

Wow. And so you have a lot, so, so there's potential for a lot of internal issues as well then is what you're

Kelsey:

saying. There's a potential for it. They do, like I said, the it's very regulated. Mm-hmm they do their, you know, their best. They keep an ultrasound on, on you the whole time they're monitoring vitals and things like that. Of course, of course. But the thing is that it doesn't replace a hospital, which if they had it in a hospital sure. You know, there's federal laws that say no funding for you. Right. So. It unfortunately. And because it's, you know, only a select percentage of people get this specific procedure, are they not trained in how to treat wow. After the procedure is done, but yeah, it's, it's an day affair and people just don't realize that it takes several hours to sure. Yeah. BA basically in the morning you have to do all of the, the Pret stuff, the state discouraging stuff. Yep. Then basically they, they break your water and they induce labor mm-hmm and then you have to wait four hours for your body to do most of the work, and then they finish off the procedure and separate you. And during that final stage, wow. They actually cannot allow your partner in the room with you. Of course. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah,

Bobby:

I mean, it just makes so much sense. I mean, right. Yeah. Yeah. Why, why would you need them in time like that, right. Yeah. And you can, you can be there when you're giving birth. and even if something goes wrong, but yeah, not for the right, like the other way, anything to try, I discourage you from, from doing it's so fucking dumb.

Kelsey:

Well, and the thing is that they have to give you something called meam for it. Mm-hmm which is supposed to make you sleepy and help you forget the procedure But the thing is that, because it makes, it made me so sleepy, every time I fell asleep, I actually stopped breathing. And so they had to keep waking me up. And so it didn't really work for me. I remember everything that happened. I remember, of course the state, her body was in. I can only imagine. Yeah. And

Bobby:

so I'm pretty sure you're not alone that too. I think most women at that point, the adrenaline is pumping so hard and, and, you know, the, the hormones are going crazy and the emotions are going crazy. Right. I mean, as it would be with anybody and I, I, how could you, you know, You're not gonna just fall asleep, like, oh,

Kelsey:

yeah. Like, yeah. So it was just, you know, a bad combination of all of those things, just right. You know, the flashbacks were rampant after and it it's, like I said, it's, it's not the caregiver's fault. They did, you know, they did their very best that they could to take care of me. They were very kind to me. Right. They gave me a card with her footprints on it and a blanket that they held her in. They were very kind and caring people, you know, they always talk about. Abortion providers like they're these cold, you know, right. Roofless lawns. Yes. Yes. And they were anything, but you know, there was one, one that held my hand the whole time.

Bento:

And at least in this situation, you were able to get one, right. I mean, even with the hurdles, at least the options there and you know, what they're trying to do now and take it away is just such a worse thing to do. So, you know yeah. You went through all that and, and got it. I, I, I can't even imagine what that would be like. I, I can't even pretend to imagine you know, but what came out, it was this from the green desk That you created. So tell us a little bit about that and what you guys

Bobby:

do over

Kelsey:

there. Yeah, absolutely. So it, it came to life this last year because I, I actually wrote a book, faced everything in rise that documents my story and my journey with abortion. And what I found is when I released the book there were people that reached out to me and said, Hey, you know, I've had an experience like this, or I've lost a child and there was never this community or this network and we need it. And I was like, well, you know, for the last 12 years I've worked for nonprofits and you know, I've, I've been through hell and You know, I can, I can figure out a way to make what happened to myself and what happened to our daughter hope matter. And so from the green desk was born and what we do is we coach and provide group therapy to people who have had abortions, lost children, lost pregnancies at, at all stages and in, in all ways. And we do that at no cost. Wow. That's amazing. That's terrific. So yeah definitely not making any money and that's fine. So long, so long as people are getting the support they need, because at the end of the day, again, things are very regulated with clinics. I was only given four phone numbers for support leaving the clinic. And that was the, the suicide hotline, the abortion support hotline, which is a lot like the suicide hotline. Mm-hmm the after hours phone number, which we talked about, and then the, a psychiatrist, an Overland park, which was three hours away from where I lived. helpful. And telehealth, telehealth. Wasn't really a thing in 2017. Yeah. Right. so right. That was it. That was my basis for support. And I tried to reach out to what I thought I was a support group and got ambushed. And we really couldn't afford for me, especially after the medical bills with hope to mm-hmm We just could not afford for me to go to regular therapy right away.

Bento:

Right. A lot of insurance companies don't won't even cover regular therapy in general anyways. So that's just another expense. Yeah. Well they have high copay. Yeah. Right. How many how many people have you had come through from the green desk and, and seek out

Kelsey:

help? So far 15, which isn't a huge number, but it's 15 people that have gotten coaching and group therapy and absolutely are not, you know, suffering in silence. I call it the silence scream. And that really is the embodiment of what it feels like to lose a child or you know, lose a pregnancy or have an abortion is it's a silent scream because people don't want you to talk about it. Right. Right. You what, no matter what. Method, you, you lose a child in, people do not wanna hear about it. And so we talk about it out loud and the relief that comes with saying it out loud is incredible.

Bento:

Oh yeah. Right. Well, cause it's such a shun thing and like all these, like these states say that like the south Midwest it's,, you can't tell people, you even, you know, sometimes people don't tell their family, they had an abortion cuz it's it's, they, they think it's such an embarrassment. It's such a bad thing. And so it's like, they can't talk about the people that you're close to.

Bobby:

I mean, yeah. OB obviously you, you wrote a book, you run this nonprofit. I, I gotta believe that your story is out in your community. Do you ever face a, any kind of backlash for any of these types of things in your community?

Kelsey:

Well, so it actually, and it's, uh, funny that you talked about, like, not being able to tell a family, we actually didn't tell our family that we had an abortion until November when the book was coming out in December. Because the stigma is so strong that it took us, you know,

Bento:

four years. Right. Are they very

Kelsey:

religious? I assume very religious. But the thing is, you know, once we told them, you know, cuz they knew that we had lost a baby like that. They, they, they knew that. But once we told them what had really happened, the love and support and the realization about. What it really means to need an abortion of healthcare was just like completely revolutionized their mind as to what that, that means. And

Bento:

so are they, are they more pro-life now because

Kelsey:

of this? Well, they're Mo more pro-choice now because, oh, sorry. Pro-choice sorry. yeah. Yeah.

Bento:

And I mean, that's incredible too, right? Cuz there's a lot of women out there who, who do what you did and tell their parents and they get the complete opposite reaction where that, that love and support goes away at that point because they don't think it was just a, you know, a, a miscarriage by Jesus, you know, it was uh, yeah. Wow. So I mean that at least you had a good experience with your, with, with your parents in that

Kelsey:

situation. Yeah. And in the community I haven't had that much. Backlash mm-hmm so I'm sensing it may come soon. Because there's a group called Kansas for constitutional freedom that are fighting the amendment being put in place. And I did a commercial for them that, you know, had my name on it so that I was from Kansas city. So, you know, there's a very real chance that I could get face some backlash, but all I did was tell the truth. And that is that if I did not have that abortion as healthcare, my son would be without a mom and my husband would be without his wife.

Bobby:

Mm. Right, right. So, absolutely. Yeah, it was 100% necessary. I mean, and that that's, that's where I think that these new laws just, they incredibly go too far. Uh, you know what I mean, people are always gonna make laws that we don't like one way or another, but this is just one of 'em that I, I don't understand how this is kind of possible. Like literally we all just compared it to a TV show, like. Yeah. Yeah. It's, it's so surreal, right? Yes,

Bento:

very much so. And it's crazy that they're not even talking about anymore, you know, Bobby and I were just saying, you know, we booked this interview with you maybe three, four weeks ago, tops. I mean, this was the most talked about topic in the country and now you can't find it anywhere. Like it's, every, everything is just kind of, now we're talking about, you know, the economy and the war, and it's crazy to think. It's just not in anybody's mind

Kelsey:

anymore. Yeah. They're really trying to sweep it as far than the regular they can. But the thing is that they've erected barricades around the Supreme court because protestors are starting to swarm harder now. Right. And if I had the money, I'd be there too. But I'm doing things in my own way. I'm, I'm sending my book to the Supreme court, as well as the senators and governors to tell them this is what the stories are on abortion and you need to pay attention.

Bento:

And that's a good segue, right? Cause a lot of people can't afford time or the travel to go do that. You know what, to the people listen to this podcast, you know, what can they do without being there to, to help

Kelsey:

fight. yeah. Uh, you know, help out your, your local centers, whether that's planned parenthood ha always has their centers that help with protests. They'll actually, they have text message lines that let you know if a protest is going on, they have text message lines that help you get trained so that you can be an advocate and speak correctly on the issue. I mean, there's a little bit of everything. If you have your own abortion story, they have workshops to help you tell it and be able to speak about it. A little easier because it takes time and it takes, you know, I didn't get training, but it would've been nice.

Bobby:

sure. Right. Such a, such a personal thing. Yeah. Any, any. Help would be nice.

Kelsey:

right.

Bobby:

Exactly. And, and I think that's, that's terrific that, you know, you recognize there was a hole there, you know, so after you had your traumatic incident, uh, your traumatic happenings, you know, you're now like, Hey, I recognize that this is an issue and there's a gap here. And so now you're taking it upon yourself to fill that gap. And I think that's so terrific. You know, thank you. And I wish you lots of luck with, for sure. With the company again, it's from the green desk, correct? I don't wanna correct. Correct. Uh, and so hopefully, uh, you know, 15 women, it's a start good for you. We're super, super happy that you got those 15 women and hopefully you don't, uh, you know, you're expanding or anything like that. You know, you gotta, you know, we're, we're up here in Rhode Island. So, uh, you know, hopefully the women around here are getting similar support from somebody up here,

Kelsey:

so, well, and it's an all online thing. So if there's someone in Rhode Island that needs the support, send my way

Bobby:

happy. That's terrific. Awesome. Yeah,

Kelsey:

that's great. And it's, like I said, it's, it's all spectra of child loss. So whether it's abortion or something else that happened, I am willing to help them unmute their screen.

Bobby:

Terrific. And so is it, and so is it just you giving those services or do you have other people helping out

as

Kelsey:

well, or myself and then a therapist actually provides the group therapy portion of it. So I I fundraise to help pay for her services.

Bobby:

terrific. Nice.

Bento:

Yeah, that's awesome. Kelsey, so yeah, we really appreciate you coming on. Uh, is there anything else you, you want, you know, we always give everybody an opportunity to plug something before they go.

Bobby:

Your book, your website, anything else? How can, how can people donate to you?

Kelsey:

Yeah. If, uh, people wanna donate or get a book or see what I'm up to everything's on from the green desk.com. So, you know, in any of the social media channels or email, it's all there. So, uh, check us out there. We're also coming out with, uh, another service called narrative meditation to help people in general be able to take their trauma and get it out via writing and you know, physically scraping the paper with that pen. So, uh, that's something that's coming out very soon that we're opening up to all sorts of. Of trauma. So

Bento:

awesome. Sorry, Kelsey. Thanks again. Uh, really appreciate you coming and giving us your time. And uh, you know, I, I think I speak for Bobby as well. Uh, you know, we truly wish you the best of luck and, uh, you know, hopefully the Supreme court decision isn't as bad as they say it's gonna be and we can continue to fight the fight.

Kelsey:

Yeah, I hope so. But if not just gonna keep raising hell

Bobby:

Yeah, absolutely. Right. Thank you so much, Kelsey. We appreciate your time.

Kelsey:

Yeah, thank you. Take care. Thanks. Bye.

Bobby:

God. Look at the next chart down in, in Florida 0.15, the woman was raped. Point zero

Bento:

one, I 0.01 incest and that's in Florida. Gosh, just they're fucking, they're banging everybody in Florida. Get outta, outta my head, dude.